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Posts for: June, 2013

Parents and families can prevent cuts, puncture wounds and other injuries from going barefoot by following some simple recommendations:

 

See a foot and ankle surgeon within 24 hours for a puncture wound.

 

Why: These injuries can embed un-sterile foreign objects deep inside the foot. A puncture wound must be cleaned properly and monitored throughout the healing process. This will help to avoid complications, such as tissue and bone infections or damage to tendons and muscles in the foot.

 

Make sure you've been vaccinated against tetanus. Experts recommend teens and adults get a booster shot every 10 years.

 

Why: Cuts and puncture wounds from sharp objects can lead to infections and illnesses such as tetanus.

 

Apply sunscreen to the tops and bottoms of your feet.

 

Why: Feet get sunburn too. Deadly skin cancers can develop on the feet.

 

Inspect your feet and your children's feet on a routine basis for skin problems such as Warts, Calluses,Ingrown Toenails and suspicious moles, spots or freckles.

 

Why: The earlier a skin condition is detected, the easier it is for your foot and ankle surgeon to treat it.

 

Wear flip-flops or sandals around swimming pools, locker rooms and beaches.

 

Why: To avoid cuts and abrasions from rough anti-slip surfaces and sharp objects hidden beneath sandy beaches, and to prevent contact with bacteria and viruses that can cause athlete's foot, plantar warts, and other problems.

 

Use common sense.

 

Why: Every year, people lose toes while mowing the lawn barefoot. Others suffer serious burns from accidentally stepping on stray campfire coals or fireworks. Murky rivers, lakes and ponds can conceal sharp objects underwater. People with diabetes should never go barefoot, even indoors, because their nervous system may not "feel" an injury and their circulatory system will struggle to heal breaks in the skin.

 

If you or someone you know have any further questions regarding the topics above or need treatment for one of the conditions listed above, please feel free to contact 1 of Our Officesfor for an appointment.


 

 

Even on the hottest days of summer, some people find themselves outside, under the scorching sun, walking around with cold feet. The cause of the cold sensation is a foot problem known as Raynaud's Disease.

 

Raynaud's Disease is a disorder that affects the hands and feet. It is caused by contraction of the smooth muscles controlling the small arteries supplying circulation into the hands and feet. This contraction, called a vaso-Spasms, makes the arteries so small that they restrict blood flow.

 

How you can combat Raynaud's, to allow your feet to warm?

 

     During the colder months, wear a scarf, gloves or mittens and a good pair of socks '  

     and boots at all  times.  A hat is also very important since the body loses a lot of

     heat through the head.

 

     During the warmer months it is good to have a sweater handy as air conditioning can trigger an attack. If  

     you are indoors, wear socks and lower the air conditioning at home; never walk around barefoot.

 

     Avoid taking cold beverages with your hands, washing vegetables with cold water and taking food from

     the freezer without gloves

 

     Don't smoke and avoid second-hand smoke as nicotine causes the skin temperature to drop

 

     Exercise frequently to improve circulation

 

     Learn relaxation techniques to reduce stress levels

 

     Do not engage in activities that put pressure on the fingertips (example playing piano or guitar)

 

Take care of your hands and feet as skin may become very dry from reduced circulation. Hydrate your skin with a lotion containing lanolin and use a soft and creamy soap. Keep your cuticles soft and hydrated.

 

If you or someone you knows suffers from a feeling of cold fingers and toes, no matter what season, please schedule an appointment  at 1 of our 3 offices for consultation: Our Offices

 

 

Middleburg Heights Office: Phone (440) 243-1473

Lyndhurst Office: Phone (216) 382-8070

Beachwood Office: Phone (216) 591-1905

 

Written By: Dr.Jennifer Zienkowski-Zubel, DPM

 
 

As public health officials nationwide take precautions to help senior citizens endure the sizzling summer weather, another group vulnerable to heat related health problems is the diabetic population. The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons urges diabetes patients to be aware that prolonged hot and humid weather can lead to myriad foot woes -- even third-degree burns -- if they don’t protect their feet carefully.

Concerns for diabetes patients in extreme heat involve swelling, dryness and cracking from wearing sandals and problems associated with walking barefoot, such as puncture wounds and burns and blisters from hot pavement. Just a few minutes walking barefoot on a hot driveway or sidewalk to fetch the newspaper can badly burn the soles of a diabetic patient’s feet due to impaired nerve sensation from the disease. Most diabetes patients know they shouldn’t walk barefoot, but sometimes think there’s no harm if it’s just for a few minutes.

Any type of skin break on a diabetic foot has the potential to get infected and ulcerate if it isn’t noticed right away. Therefore, wearing sandals all the time in the summer poses problems. Feet constantly exposed in flip-flops or strap sandals lose moisturizing oils, causing dry, rough skin prone to cracking.

Some diabetes patients experience foot swelling in hot weather, which makes their shoes fit tighter and may exert blister-causing pressure on the toes and heels. Like it or not, diabetes patients whose feet get swollen in hot weather should wear support stockings. Compression is the best way to reduce swelling and avoid complications such as poor circulation and further impaired nerve function.

Vigilant foot care is a year-round responsibility for diabetes patients, but the temptations of summer can test even the most conscientious patient’s resolve.

What’s more natural than bare feet and sandals in the summer? Unfortunately, there’s no off-season for diabetes, so patients must be very careful with their feet to avoid skin breaks and subsequent infections and ulcerations that result from this disease.

For further information about diabetic foot care and/or set-up a consultation.  Please contact 1 of our 3 offices:

Middleburg Heights Office: Phone (440) 243-1473

Lyndhurst Office: Phone (216) 382-8070

Beachwood Office: Phone (216) 591-1905


Flip flop sandals in every color, design and material are always popular in the summertime for everyone. But, while these types of sandals are fun, they shouldn’t become the mainstay of your footwear wardrobe.

Wearing flip flops too often can result in foot problems. With no arch support, and no stability, flip flops cause abnormal stress on the plantar fascia (the band of tissue that extends from the heel to the base of the toes). The resulting condition, known as“plantar fasciitis,” usually causes pain in the heel immediately upon arising in the morning or after periods of inactivity during the day.  Plantar fasciitis can be a persistent problem that takes a long time to effectively treat.  The best way to deal with the condition is to avoid it in the first place by wearing supportive footwear that provides sufficient shock absorption. 

 

It’s not necessary to completely avoid the popular footwear style. But, to save yourself from a lot of unnecessary pain, think of your flip flops as your dessert, not the main dish in your summer wardrobe and wear them sparingly.

 

Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS)


Flip flop sandals in every color, design and material are always popular in the summertime for everyone. But, while these types of sandals are fun, they shouldn’t become the mainstay of your footwear wardrobe.

 

Wearing flip flops too often can result in foot problems. With no arch support, and no stability, flip flops cause abnormal stress on the plantar fascia (the band of tissue that extends from the heel to the base of the toes). The resulting condition, known as“plantar fasciitis,” usually causes pain in the heel immediately upon arising in the morning or after periods of inactivity during the day.  Plantar fasciitis can be a persistent problem that takes a long time to effectively treat.  The best way to deal with the condition is to avoid it in the first place by wearing supportive footwear that provides sufficient shock absorption. 

It’s not necessary to completely avoid the popular footwear style. But, to save yourself from a lot of unnecessary pain, think of your flip flops as your dessert, not the main dish in your summer wardrobe and wear them sparingly.

 

Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS)